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Dec 27, 2009

Comments

So, the next guy to try to bomb a jetline full of civilians may be smart enough to not use his weeine for a wick and all you privacy types will be crying that it is somehow the fault of the evil Bush, I'm sure.

Another question I have is that the effective database was scotched because it could be used to catch criminals. So, exactly what is wrong with catching criminals? Please use small words here, after all we spend billions of dollars every year to catch criminals, more billions to keep 'em locked up and each year far too may law enforcement officers die trying to catch criminals, and thousands and thousands of civilians are killed by criminals.

Meanwhile every time I buy something I start getting bazillions of E-mails from everyone selling anything at all like that. Here is an idea, tell the folks in charge of keeping us alive everything they need while keeping our information quiet from salespeople.

Full props to the passenger who jumped on the flaming asshole,

Well, not to get all technical on you, but it was a flaming dick.

Why is it that the privacy radicals such as Theater conflate rights and privileges? If you don't want to give minimal data for the sake of reasonable security, don't fly.

When flying is essential to be a functional member of the society, it isn't just a privilege, as you so casually put it. And just calling me a privacy radical doesn't make me one. Asking for justification for your overreach doesn't make me a radical, and I don't see any justification either in the post or in the comments.

Why is it that the privacy radicals such as Theater conflate rights and privileges?

First off, calling me a privacy radical doesn't make me one. Second, the fact that the ability to get on a plane is often essential to make a livelihood and live and function in this country makes it more than just a privilege, as you casually put it. Third, it doesn't make me an extremist to ask for justification for your overreach.

Let me propose a counter: mandatory cavity searches for everybody. Surely, that will be more effective than additional information, which will also likely be inaccurate. It will even catch people like the bomber who tried to assassinate a Saudi prince, which none of our current and proposed scanning techniques will capture. Will you oppose this search because you consider it invasive? Does that make you a privacy radical? Or somebody who values human lives and security too lightly?

"Payroll patriots," now that is funny...I'll remember that one next time a TSA employee flips out over the nail clipper he finds in my carry on. As in "take a breath, Mike, he's just a payroll patriot parroting the manufactured outrage he was trained to display."

It's important to remember, during all this discussion, that profiling was three-for-three on bomb plots thus far.

Location. Location. Location. Lets not forget from whence the Christmas terrorist threat came from. Nigeria >Yemen > Amsterdam. Politically screening Americans with no terrorist history, background or FBI file does not help you catch airborne foreign terrorists. Hence, the Real ID Act is not going to save you either. The Real ID Act screens and scrutinizes US citizens on US soil. Your problem is getting the VISA departments in these countries to stop giving the green light to people who have documented terrorist intent. Wasting American tax money creating traveller traps is not catching terrorists.

Before 9/11, I traveled by air many times in India. In India they have known for a long time about terrorist attacks in general and bombs on plans in particular. So:
Before every flight leaving from an Indian airport, I was subject to a pat-down search by uniformed Indian security. Each passenger stepped up on a low platform and was patted down. Women and men were patted down separately, by male and female personnel respectively.
At the time I did not consider this an invasion of privacy. Rather I was happy that the government was doing what it could to protect my life from terrorists.
All checked baggage and carry-ons were X-rayed as well.

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